TAKE THE LANE

Bikes may use the full lane, when necessary.

remember when I first heard about “taking the lane”. It made me cringe. My thought was “You have got to be kidding. That is insane!” There was no way I would consider doing it. But I kept hearing  other cyclists talking about it and suggesting it. Finally I took the plunge and tried it. WOW! What a difference it made. Now I do it all the time. I have to admit that I would not do it everywhere if I have a choice as some roads are just too busy and dangerous.

One thing I will say is that it is important to take the lane when you are taking the lane. Some cyclists still ride over to the far right of the lane and by doing so motorists often don’t move over to another lane. They pass by the cyclist all too closely sharing the same lane.  I always ride either in the middle  (B) or even left of center (A) of the lane which forces motorists to pass me using the other lane. I think the very center is best. Riding in B some motorists will still try to  share the lane and pass by all too closely on your right side.

Another factor involving lane position is that riding on the right side of a traffic lane makes it harder for motorists to see you. When I ride on streets taking the lane I am sure to turn on more of my blinking taillights, especially my brightest ones.  I also usually have one taillight on which is set on steady on … not flashing. I always have my high visibility safety flags flying and flapping attracting attention.

As I understand it in all 50 U.S. States it is legal for cyclists to take the lane. I am not sure of this but I think that if a bike lane exists for cyclists to use some places require the cyclists to ride in the bike lane rather than taking the lane. Personally I prefer to take the lane as bike lanes are too dangerous and I don’t like riding in them.

Here are some tips from this website:

  • Always be predictable – drivers should know what you’re about to do, no sudden, unexpected man oeuvres.
  • If in doubt: slow down, move off the road, stop. Mistakes in traffic are more costly than a few lost minutes.
  • Just like driving any other vehicle in traffic: be careful, calm, but confident.
  • Try to anticipate other people’s mistakes, and position yourself so that when (if) they happen, there’s no accident. Always try to read what the others will do.

Lastly, here are some other websites with useful information on them.

https://www.bikeleague.org/content/traffic-laws

U.S. Bicycle Laws by State

My final words on this … according to what others report motorists behavior and attitudes are not the same everywhere. Where I live and ride I have no issues with motorists. They are respectful and patient. Rarely does anyone honk or yell in anger. Some trikers who live and ride elsewhere report serious issues with motorists. They have bad attitudes and can get quite aggressive and ugly. If that were what I would be up against I would probably have to make some changes and do things differently. The important thing is for all of us to be safe out there.

KEEP ON TRIKIN’

FREE GIFT awaits you!

CROSSWALKS AND THE LAW

Do crosswalks scare and concern you like they do me? I nearly got hit today crossing a busy street while using the crosswalk. Here in Indiana where I live the law for motorists concerning crosswalks is a joke. Rarely does anyone pays any attention to the law requiring motorists to yield to those who are in the crosswalks. Even the police pay no attention to the law. I had sat there waiting and waiting for the traffic to clear so I could safely cross the street. Nobody stopped to let me cross. Finally the way appeared clear and I took off. The next thing I knew a pickup truck came speeding along headed right for me. I never saw it before I started to cross. I threw up my arm signalling for him to stop but he just kept coming getting dangerously close to me. He slowed down a little but wasn’t about to stop. He steered over at the side of the street to avoid hitting me. Once he got passed me he zoomed off on his way. Like I said, the law doesn’t mean a thing. It gets old and I can’t help but wonder why drivers get away from it … why the law is not enforced. I say if it is not going to be enforced then get rid of it. I think it is high time arrests are made and that they really crack down on it. As a teenager growing up I rarely had gone far from home. Then I joined the Navy and upon arriving out in California I saw the police really enforcing crosswalk laws. I was amazed thinking “What’s wrong with Indiana that they don’t do this?” I was truly impressed with California. That was back in the 1960s and 1970s. I don’t know how it is now.

Many trails cross roads and often times there are crosswalks there. I have found these to be especially dangerous. Some motorists do stop to allow trail users to cross. That is appreciated but there is a problem … a bad problem. They stop but other motorists don’t. Whether coming from the opposite direction or the same direction. The trail user faces morons that not only don’t slow up but they actually go over into another lane to go around the car or truck that stopped to allow the trail user to cross. It is so dangerous. People are nuts! When a motorist does the right thing yielding to those in crosswalks other motorist  get mad honking their horns at them and yelling at them before tearing around them truly endangering anyone who might be crossing the road. So I have learned to be extremely careful when someone does stop to allow me to cross.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedestrian_crossing

WHY DID THE PLAINTIFF CROSS THE ROAD? Understanding Pedestrian and Crosswalk Laws in All 50 States

https://www.bikeleague.org/StateBikeLaws

KEEP ON TRIKIN’

A FREE GIFT awaits you!

 

U.S. E-BIKE LAWS EXPLAINED

The law defined a low-speed electric bicycle as “A two- or three-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph.” NCSL

E-bike regulations by state

E-bike laws in the world

Some states have adopted the 3 tier classification of e-bikes …

Class 1 electric bicycle: A bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 2 electric bicycle: A bicycle equipped with a motor that may be used exclusively to propel the bicycle, and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 3 electric bicycle:      A bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour and is equipped with a speedometer.

Sadly … “Any device outside of these definitions is not considered a low-speed electric bicycle that would be regulated as a bicycle.”

A FREE GIFT awaits you!

SOME LEGAL INFO ON E-BIKES

E-motor assist trikes are becoming more and more popular. I have one myself and love it. One thing I have noticed is that there seems to be a lot of confusion and differing thoughts, beliefs, uncertainties and opinions about the legal aspect of these machines. Obviously not everybody can be correct when so often these conflict. Here is help in sorting it all out. To summarize the subject matter … “it’s a mess” and that is fairly typical of most everything the government gets involved in.

HERE is a website which has information on e-bikes according to individual State laws. This applies to both pedal assist and motor assist.

HERE is another website which has information on the laws on e-bikes. I like this one as it seems a bit more “user-friendly” the way it is written.

HERE is a .pdf report on e-bike laws.

One thing I noticed is that some States require a helmet be worn when riding an e-bike. I am not a fan of the government forcing people to wear helmets. I think it should be a personal choice which the government should keep their nose out of. It is not a matter of whether or not I believe in helmets. It is solely a matter of too much government control in our lives.

Whether you ride with or without e-assist I hope you continue to …

ENJOY THE RIDE!

FREE GIFT awaits you!

TERRATRIKE RAMBLER SAFETY RECALL

I just saw this posted on Facebook and am passing it on …

TerraTrike

Important Safety Recall:
If you purchased a TerraTrike Rambler between May – August 2018, there is a Safety Recall for you to be aware of. TerraTrike is conducting this Fast Track recall with the CPSC (U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission) to recall the Ramblers affected. No accidents or injuries have been reported; however, this recall is being conducted in order to protect consumers.

Short excerpt from the CPSC Release:
“Recalled models include: TerraTrike Rambler x16 (orange), Rambler All Terrain (green) and Rambler E.V.O. (yellow). The trikes, depending upon model, come with either three 20-inch wheels or three 24-inch wheels. The model names are located on the outrigger tubes that come out of the main tube and connect to the front wheels. The serial numbers included in this recall are listed on the firm’s website at www.terratrike.com and are located under the main tube on a barcoded sticker near the rear wheel. The serial numbers are also stamped into the head (vertical) tube of the outrigger. ” – CPSC Release

Please read the complete CPSC Release here:
http://terratrike.com/recall.php

Here is a portion of the recall notice linked to above …

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission – Fast Track Recall


Recall Date: SEPTEMBER 27, 2018
Recall Number: 18-236

Recall Summary

Name of Product: Adult tricycles (trikes)

Hazard: The right hand wheel hubmount can bend or break, allowing the user to lose control of the trike, which can result in serious injury or death.

Remedy: Repair

Consumers should immediately stop using these recalled trikes and return them to the place of purchase for a free repair.

Consumer Contact: TerraTrike at 800-945-9110 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.terratrike.com  and click on “Important Recall” for more information.

Recall Details

Units: 600

Description:
The recalled products are TerraTrike adult, pedal powered, orange, green or yellow tricycles. They have two wheels in the front and one wheel in the back and black canvas seat. Recalled models include: TerraTrike Rambler x16 (orange), Rambler All Terrain (green) and Rambler E.V.O. (yellow). The trikes, depending upon model, come with either three 20-inch wheels or three 24-inch wheels. The model names are located on the outrigger tubes that come out of the main tube and connect to the front wheels. The serial numbers included in this recall are listed on the firm’s website at www.terratrike.com and are located under the main tube on a barcoded sticker near the rear wheel. The serial numbers are also stamped into the head (vertical) tube of the outrigger.

Incidents/Injuries:
The firm has received seven reports of the hub mounts bending or breaking. No accidents or injuries have been reported.

Sold at: Authorized TerraTrike dealers, independent bicycle dealers and recumbent bicycle specialty stores nationwide and online at http://www.TerraTrike.com from May 2018 through August 2018 for between $2,000 and $3,500.

Importer: WizWheelz Inc., dba TerraTrike, of Grand Rapids, Mich.

Distributor: TerraTrike, of Grand Rapids, Mich.

Manufacturer: Forever Machine Industrial Co., Ltd., of Taichung, Taiwan

Manufactured in: Taiwan

LEGAL HELP, ADVICE & INFORMATION FOR CYCLISTS

came across a website recently that got my attention and thought it might be good to share it here. Accidents happen whether our fault or the fault of someone else including faulty products. BicycleLaw.com is the website of bicycle accident attorney, Bob Mionske, who was himself actively involved in cycling as a a former Olympic and professional cyclist until retirement from it in 1994. He practices law in all 50 States and has some free information, advice and articles on his website which one might find useful. Hopefully you will never need his services, but if you do his law practice that is exclusively focused on representing cyclists who have been injured by motorists, unsafe road conditions, or defective cycling products. He offers free consultation.

**********

FREE GIFT awaits you!